Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
tardigrades_dismissal_motion [2019/03/13 17:50]
Carlos Pedraza
tardigrades_dismissal_motion [2019/09/20 13:12] (current)
Carlos Pedraza [No Substantial Similarity]
Line 57: Line 57:
  
 [{{:​two_tardigrades.jpg?​direct|//​Do these two versions of tardigrades evince the same ‘aesthetic appeal’? <fs x-small>​Click image to view full size</​fs>​.//​}}] [{{:​two_tardigrades.jpg?​direct|//​Do these two versions of tardigrades evince the same ‘aesthetic appeal’? <fs x-small>​Click image to view full size</​fs>​.//​}}]
 +{{anchor:​substantial_similarity}}
 <wrap lo>​**What is Substantial Similarity?​** \\ <wrap indent>​According to the American Bar Association,​ in [[:​copyright_infringement|copyright infringement]] cases courts traditionally test for substantial similarity using "a subjective, factual analysis called the ‘audience test,'"​ whose goal is to see if ordinary observers, unless they set out to detect the differences between the works, "would regard their aesthetic appeal as the same."</​wrap>​(([[http://​www.americanbar.org/​groups/​young_lawyers/​publications/​the_101_201_practice_series/​part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]],​ by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/​08/​16.)) ​  \\ <wrap indent> Moreover, the audience test "asks whether the defendant wrongly copied enough of the plaintiff’s protected expression to cause a reasonable lay observer to immediately detect the similarities between the plaintiff’s expression and the defendant’s work, without any aid or suggestion from others."​(([[http://​www.americanbar.org/​groups/​young_lawyers/​publications/​the_101_201_practice_series/​part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]],​ by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.)) </​wrap></​wrap>​ </​WRAP>​ <wrap lo>​**What is Substantial Similarity?​** \\ <wrap indent>​According to the American Bar Association,​ in [[:​copyright_infringement|copyright infringement]] cases courts traditionally test for substantial similarity using "a subjective, factual analysis called the ‘audience test,'"​ whose goal is to see if ordinary observers, unless they set out to detect the differences between the works, "would regard their aesthetic appeal as the same."</​wrap>​(([[http://​www.americanbar.org/​groups/​young_lawyers/​publications/​the_101_201_practice_series/​part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]],​ by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/​08/​16.)) ​  \\ <wrap indent> Moreover, the audience test "asks whether the defendant wrongly copied enough of the plaintiff’s protected expression to cause a reasonable lay observer to immediately detect the similarities between the plaintiff’s expression and the defendant’s work, without any aid or suggestion from others."​(([[http://​www.americanbar.org/​groups/​young_lawyers/​publications/​the_101_201_practice_series/​part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]],​ by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.)) </​wrap></​wrap>​ </​WRAP>​