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tardigrades_dismissal_motion [2019/03/13 17:50]
Carlos Pedraza
tardigrades_dismissal_motion [2019/09/20 13:12] (current)
Carlos Pedraza [No Substantial Similarity]
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 [{{:two_tardigrades.jpg?direct|//Do these two versions of tardigrades evince the same ‘aesthetic appeal’? <fs x-small>Click image to view full size</fs>.//}}] [{{:two_tardigrades.jpg?direct|//Do these two versions of tardigrades evince the same ‘aesthetic appeal’? <fs x-small>Click image to view full size</fs>.//}}]
 +{{anchor:substantial_similarity}}
 <wrap lo>**What is Substantial Similarity?** \\ <wrap indent>According to the American Bar Association, in [[:copyright_infringement|copyright infringement]] cases courts traditionally test for substantial similarity using "a subjective, factual analysis called the ‘audience test,'" whose goal is to see if ordinary observers, unless they set out to detect the differences between the works, "would regard their aesthetic appeal as the same."</wrap>(([[http://www.americanbar.org/groups/young_lawyers/publications/the_101_201_practice_series/part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]], by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.))   \\ <wrap indent> Moreover, the audience test "asks whether the defendant wrongly copied enough of the plaintiff’s protected expression to cause a reasonable lay observer to immediately detect the similarities between the plaintiff’s expression and the defendant’s work, without any aid or suggestion from others."(([[http://www.americanbar.org/groups/young_lawyers/publications/the_101_201_practice_series/part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]], by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.)) </wrap></wrap> </WRAP> <wrap lo>**What is Substantial Similarity?** \\ <wrap indent>According to the American Bar Association, in [[:copyright_infringement|copyright infringement]] cases courts traditionally test for substantial similarity using "a subjective, factual analysis called the ‘audience test,'" whose goal is to see if ordinary observers, unless they set out to detect the differences between the works, "would regard their aesthetic appeal as the same."</wrap>(([[http://www.americanbar.org/groups/young_lawyers/publications/the_101_201_practice_series/part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]], by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.))   \\ <wrap indent> Moreover, the audience test "asks whether the defendant wrongly copied enough of the plaintiff’s protected expression to cause a reasonable lay observer to immediately detect the similarities between the plaintiff’s expression and the defendant’s work, without any aid or suggestion from others."(([[http://www.americanbar.org/groups/young_lawyers/publications/the_101_201_practice_series/part_2_elements_of_a_copyright.html|An Overview of the Elements of a Copyright Infringement Cause of Action, — Part II: Improper Appropriation]], by Jason Sloane, retrieved 12/08/16.)) </wrap></wrap> </WRAP>